Dead-letter clues

Because the law said so Maybe you descend from J.B. Arnold or Miss S.S. Berry or Georgia Dennise or William Murphy or James Parker. Perhaps you’re researching Seth Cockerilie or Emma Johnson or Josiah Price or Rose Anne Regan or Cole Watkins. They all had one...

Beyond the named parties

Not just the story of Aaron Burr The Grand Jury in and for the U.S. Circuit Court for the District of Kentucky, Frankfort Term, was convinced. The man had committed treason against the United States of America. “He did willfully and unlawfully, and from evil...

Mapping San Diego

Revisiting county boundaries The Legal Genealogist is heading off to Carlsbad, California, tomorrow on the last long-distance road trip of the year, for a a day of fun with a return visit to the North San Diego County Genealogical Society and its 2019 Fall Seminar at...

When it’s not online

That pesky GPS thing again There is one essential truism in genealogy that every single genealogist — The Legal Genealogist included — has encountered at one point or another to our dismay: It’s not all online. As a matter of fact, it’s...

In gold or silver coin

About those lawbooks… What exactly did Elizabeth Wright do for a living around 1867? You won’t find the answer in the 1850 census, even though you can find her in the 1850 census of St. Louis, Missouri. She was recorded as 38 years old, born in Scotland,...

Mapping San Mateo

Just where would that ancestor have lived? So… an ancestor died in San Mateo County, California, on 1 January 1886. His obituary kindly informs us that he had lived in the same house for exactly 40 years, having moved in on 1 January 1846. Here’s the...

Taking notice

A lesson from Arkansas law It is one of the most basic elements of the law. You can’t do something about an issue if you don’t know about it. And so the law makes people who want you to have to do something — or who want to do something to you...

Discovering fiction

Another example of why not to accept automated systems So The Legal Genealogist opened the email program this morning and there it was. A personal discovery, just for me, according to the automated system notice from one of the big genealogical companies.1 Another...

Turn the page!

The rest of the story So many times, the answer to a genealogical question can be found with a simple action. Turn the page. And … sigh … The Legal Genealogist occasionally needs a reminder to find the book that has the pages to turn them. Case in point....

On this day

Checking those historical facts The Legal Genealogist is very fond of the various websites that are willing to tell us what happened on this day in history. Despite their occasional inaccuracies,1 the websites that serve up history in sound bites often provide fodder...