Where is that place?

Here’s one way to find it… A genealogist across the country needed to know the physical proximity of two New Jersey cemeteries to try to understand how a burial in one cemetery got reported by a Find A Grave contributor as having been in the other —...

Turning the page

When the answer “isn’t there” The answer to the question wasn’t there. Not in those minutes of the May 1793 term of the Court of Common Pleas in Hunterdon County, New Jersey. Reader Pat Steinkerchner had carefully copied the entire set of minutes because...

Finding Aunt Samantha

Hiding in plain sight She appears on the 1850 census of Cherokee County, Alabama, as Samantha Battles. Second in a list of seven children in the household of William and Ann (Jacobs) Battles. Age 18. Born in Alabama.1 And then, it seemed, she disappeared. The working...

That nice neat package

And the risk it poses Any time a genealogist encounters a set of church records, it’s enough to bring a smile to our faces. Even a set that doesn’t include any of our own family members. They’re a treat because they often record things that...

Behind the numbers

The burning of Chelsea The story is hidden there, behind the numbers. The population of Chelsea, Massachusetts — a Boston suburb — rose steadily through nine straight censuses, from 642 residents in 1820 to 34,072 in 1900. And the rate of growth in some of...

Recording all the details

Family history is more than begats Yesterday’s post about a resource on military legal history prompted friend and genealogical colleague Gordon Remington to offer his own reminder of another tome that genealogists will find useful. It’s one The Legal...

Researching Beyond Kin

“For every soul a story, a family a name.” Beyond our parents. Beyond our brothers and sisters. Beyond our grandparents, aunts and uncles. Beyond our cousins. Beyond even those who might be considered our kin. Beyond them all, our people had other people to whom they...