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A DNA whyne

No, that’s not exactly misspelled… So last week The Legal Genealogist set DNA research goals for 2022: to identify the four closest yet-unidentified autosomal DNA matches, one at each of the four major testing companies. Clocking in at 125 centiMorgans...

Diese verdammte deutsche Schrift

In other words… So for the last week The Legal Genealogist has been whimpering on a daily basis. Is that a capital L or a capital B? A lower case e or n or u? Yep, since — like about one-sixth of all Americans — I have German ancestry, I have been...

Gerhard’s baptism

Record missing in action Johnny George, you and The Legal Genealogist may hafta have words. You, Johann Jürgen Nuckel, just might have some ‘splainin’ to do. Yes, I know that — among my 24 identified German fourth great grandparents —...

Milestones, 2022

Looking back to 2021, forward to 2022 The very best part of falling headlong into family history research is the stories. Stories in The Legal Genealogist’s family take us back a long way in America on the maternal side and in Germany on the paternal side. Stories...

Recording a lifetime…

Looking back on nearly 70 years Here at the end of 2021, the lyrics of a Paul Simon song that The Legal Genealogist has adored for decades have a particular power: Can you imagine us years from today Sharing a park bench quietly? How terribly strange to be 70…1...

Those first DNA testers…

Looking back on those tests Today is the last Sunday of 2021, and the last time for The Legal Genealogist to think back on the pros, cons, and complications of using DNA as part and parcel of genealogical evidence. Which makes it a perfect time to look back at the...

Space Age expectations

… not exactly what was envisioned … It’s probably the defining aspect of The Legal Genealogist’s lifetime. I am a child of the Space Age. One of my very first memories as a child is of standing in the backyard of a rented home in San Rafael,...

Another theory shot down

Saying it ain’t so, Joe… There’s an absolutely lovely story out there on the internet about the parents of Joseph Moore, who died in Caldwell County, Kentucky, around 1820. Repeated in roughly a kazillion online family trees, the story is that he was...

Giving thanks, 2021 style

For all that we have Thanksgiving has always been The Legal Genealogist’s favorite holiday. Focusing on — in this order — family, food and football (go Rutgers! beat Maryland!), it’s one of the low-stress holidays even if an occasional feast...