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Those snippets

Word-picture postcards of a life They are among the most precious gifts a genealogist can ever receive. Those snippets that help breathe life into the names and dates and places of our research. In late August 1908, The Legal Genealogist’s great grandfather...

The Bug

The day it met the trooper… Yes, The Legal Genealogist knows that 2021 is a Brood X year — the cicadas either are already here or they’re coming to wherever they plan to emerge. This isn’t that kind of bug. The capital letter is there for a...

Memorial Day 2021

Remember and honor You can’t help but think how much they had in common … and yet how very different they were. Their commonalities: both were born to pioneering families. Both chose to fight to protect what they believed in. Both were 23 years old when...

In the backyard

The things we never do It began again with a friend’s question on Facebook. “I’m from St Louis”, she wrote, “and I’ve never been to the top of the arch. Have you?” And that started The Legal Genealogist back down Memory Lane again. Because every last one of us,...

Links in the family chains

Why chase land grant records The Legal Genealogist loves the readers of this blog. And Facebook friends. And the genealogical community in general. Yesterday, I asked folks to join with me in crowdsourcing the acquisition of North Carolina land grant records for the...

Remembering Sherman

A trip down Memory Lane It was a question posted on Facebook that sent The Legal Genealogist down Memory Lane. A question to the effect of: what was the first car you ever owned? For me, in the summer of 1969, it was a tank. Well, maybe not exactly, but… I had...

Once again, the hands of time

No words needed This is, by far, The Legal Genealogist’s favorite photograph, ever. My mother and her grandchild Hann. First published here in 2015 and worth repeating every chance I can get. Since it’s DNA Sunday, the subtitle can be “my...

Too much to ask?

Sigh… apparently… Consistency. It’s a genealogist’s dream. All the records about one person would all have the same name. All the dates of one event would all be in the same year. All of the places for that one event would all be in the same...

Doubts about dower

Not everywhere at all times On the 10th of December 1874, a couple with whom The Legal Genealogist has more than just a passing acquaintance sold off 39 and 2/3 acres of land in Parker County, Texas. G.W. and Martha L. “Cotrell,” as their names appear in the document,...

If this was easy….

… it wouldn’t be fun, right? The Legal Genealogist’s mother was Hazel (Cottrell) Geissler (1926 Texas – 1999 Virginia). Hazel’s mother was Opal (Robertson) Cottrell (1898 Texas – 1995 Virginia). Opal’s mother was Eula (Baird...