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For Washingtonians too

An option for the Evergreen State So… a couple of days ago, The Legal Genealogist told Oregonians about a terrific resource for legal research into the early laws of Oregon and a number of west coast and mountain states. The State of Oregon Law Library offers...

Licensing liquor

The 1849 repealer The Legal Genealogist could have predicted it. Should have foreseen it. In yesterday’s blog post, I wrote about the 1844 Oregon law that banned ardent spirits — liquor — completely from the territory, and mentioned, simply, that “It...

The gift of land

A double-edged sword It is one of the most remarkable pieces of legislation of its time. With the official title of “An Act to create the Office of Surveyor-General of the Public Lands in Oregon, and to provide for the Survey, and to make Donations to Settlers of the...

Finding the Feds

Sources for federal laws Since this appears to be Resource Week here at The Legal Genealogist, it’s time to review one particular type of resource that comes up time and again: How do we find federal statutes? This came up just recently in a reader question...

More Virginia lingo

Not just in Virginia… It’s a Virginia day! It’s actually an entire Virginia weekend!! The Legal Genealogist is off to the Old Dominion today for the Fairfax Genealogical Society 2017 Spring Conference in Falls Church, which gets underway at the...

Virginia is for sharing

The language of the law. Part Latin, part Anglo-Saxon, all confusing. So The Legal Genealogist is getting ready to pack it up. Not permanently, no. Just for the weekend. To the Fairfax Genealogical Society 2017 Spring Conference in Falls Church, Virginia, which gets...

Reading every word

The tidbits in the tables… More than once, The Legal Genealogist has said it. To understand the records, we have to understand the law — and not just in general, but the specific law in the specific time and specific place where the record was created.1...

In the swamp

Those other land acts The puzzlement of The Legal Genealogist over the migration of an ancestor from Alabama to Arkansas between 1850 and 1860 led to some research being done by readers, and some suggestions being offered. And one in particular needs some more...