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More on dower

Some nuances this time In The Legal Genealogist’s experience, it never fails. Answer one reader question with basic information, and the “well, what about…” questions come rolling in. You’d think I’d have learned by now to add in some of the...

Tarheel dower

Researching dower in North Carolina Reader Marcia is puzzled. “I have been doing family history in North Carolina and dealing with Dower and other goodies,” she writes. “When she got the land as a dower right did the widow own it outright?” Great question, because a...

Review: how white was white enough?

Race and the naturalization law Note: As we all struggle to come to terms with current events, it may prove helpful to look back at some of our history. Believing firmly that knowing how we got here may help us all see the way forward, The Legal Genealogist will...

Just peachy…

Historic Georgia laws Reader Gay Solomon has one of those questions for The Legal Genealogist: where do we find the laws? “An unmarried man died in Georgia in 1832,” she writes. “His estate (personal property–no real) was evenly divided amongst his siblings...

Dead-letter clues

Because the law said so Maybe you descend from J.B. Arnold or Miss S.S. Berry or Georgia Dennise or William Murphy or James Parker. Perhaps you’re researching Seth Cockerilie or Emma Johnson or Josiah Price or Rose Anne Regan or Cole Watkins. They all had one...

The laws of Christmas: 2019 reprise

It wasn’t always a holiday In keeping with The Legal Genealogist’s holiday tradition of keeping the blog going while scrambling to handle holiday duties, this post (a reprise from years past), has a question for you: Are you planning for a good rest in...

The first to record

With all due respect to the State of Georgia… There are times when The Legal Genealogist just can’t manage to silence that ear worm. You know the one I mean. It’s the Gershwin song from Porgy and Bess with the title that’s just too appropriate...