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A new year… and new terms

Updates to terms of use It’s a New Year, there’s a new privacy law in effect in California, and three of the big DNA testing companies — 23andMe, Ancestry and MyHeritage — have updated their terms of use and/or privacy statements to bring...

2019 alphabet soup: T is for …

A reminder on terms of use The Legal Genealogist was privileged last night to participate in a discussion of the GEDmatch buyout by the forensic biotech firm Verogen. Part of the Wacky Wednesday series by DearMYRTLE, the discussion is now archived and can be reviewed...

Citing Google Maps

The rules for attribution Google Maps are truly wonderful resources and many genealogists (and others!) use them all the time — in articles, on websites, in presentations and more. Which, The Legal Genealogist hastens to add, is (a) perfectly legal as long as...

Ancestry updates its terms

No major changes Ancestry has updated its terms and conditions to revise certain privacy provisions. Though as always The Legal Genealogist thinks everyone should read all terms and conditions carefully, and particularly where — as here — terms and...

Revisiting the rules

The genealogy book and Ancestry’s terms of use Reader Stan C. is about to finish an impressive piece of work… and is plagued with a real concern. “I am in the final stages of research on a large genealogy book I am publishing,” he wrote. “Is it legal to...

Fair use and terms of use

A study in contrasts It’s a great question, from reader Dana J.: Does contract law override “fair use”? Can a website’s terms of use prohibit users from using the copyright-protected works under fair use? It seems that copyright’s fair use provision might be one...

Thank you, LOC!

A new free-to-use page at the Library of Congress It isn’t possible to overstate the value of the Library of Congress to the genealogical researcher. Time and time and time again, The Legal Genealogist has pointed out something that’s available at the...

The fix is in

Ancestry fixes TOS error Quietly and without fanfare, in its rollout of new and updated terms of service, Ancestry killed the professional researcher. It didn’t mean to. It was a mistake. So… quietly and without fanfare … in an update of even newer...