One week left

Speak out against USCIS fee hike! Today, December 23, there is just one week to go. One week to speak out. One week to say that a public agency raising fees for public records well beyond the reach of any average citizen is just not acceptable. One week to join The...

A little more time

Oppose the USCIS fee hikes The genealogical community has a little more time as it’s mobilizing to fight the extraordinary fee increases proposed by the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services agency for its Genealogy Program and the records provided under it....

Records, not revenue

Opposing the fee hike Nobody with a functioning brain expects genealogy to be free. Yeah, yeah, The Legal Genealogist knows there are those who think it should be free — that having to buy copies of birth, marriage and death certificates and court documents and...

Going, going…

… Gone to Kansas City Researching federal court records has always been a bit of a problem. First, of course, a researcher like The Legal Genealogist needed to know what record group the National Archives of the United States had assigned the specific type of...

Perseverance paying off

Vital records officers changing gears There is no evidence that closing vital records for long time periods prevents identity theft. The Legal Genealogist knows that. You know that. And now, for the first time, the people in charge of vital records are beginning to...

Restoring the ancestors, round 2

A new indexing opportunity It was a joy for The Legal Genealogist to join the initiative launched earlier this year by the Center for Family History at the International African American Museum, FamilySearch and BlackProGen Live called Restore the Ancestors 2019, “a...

Reading the law again

New access to case reporters Some time ago, The Legal Genealogist was over the moon at the very thought of having free online access to the case reporters held by the Harvard Law School Library. It was nearly four years ago that Harvard announced that it had partnered...

Ancestry and Arolsen

Digitization brings Holocaust-era records online Wolf and Moses Arm were Polish citizens when they sailed to the United States as displaced persons aboard the SS Marine Perch in August of 1946. Wolf was 16. Moses was 6. There weren’t any adults with that surname...