Mapping San Mateo

Just where would that ancestor have lived? So… an ancestor died in San Mateo County, California, on 1 January 1886. His obituary kindly informs us that he had lived in the same house for exactly 40 years, having moved in on 1 January 1846. Here’s the...

Taking notice

A lesson from Arkansas law It is one of the most basic elements of the law. You can’t do something about an issue if you don’t know about it. And so the law makes people who want you to have to do something — or who want to do something to you...

Discovering fiction

Another example of why not to accept automated systems So The Legal Genealogist opened the email program this morning and there it was. A personal discovery, just for me, according to the automated system notice from one of the big genealogical companies.1 Another...

Turn the page!

The rest of the story So many times, the answer to a genealogical question can be found with a simple action. Turn the page. And … sigh … The Legal Genealogist occasionally needs a reminder to find the book that has the pages to turn them. Case in point....

On this day

Checking those historical facts The Legal Genealogist is very fond of the various websites that are willing to tell us what happened on this day in history. Despite their occasional inaccuracies,1 the websites that serve up history in sound bites often provide fodder...

Equal opportunity DNA criticism

Don’t take ThruLines as gospel either So a couple of weeks ago The Legal Genealogist focused on the dangers of uncritical acceptance of the automated systems at the DNA testing companies that link us to possible/proposed ancestors by showing how one suggested...

Just a theory

The dangers of uncritical acceptance There are some really cool tools to be used these days to help analyze our DNA results up against our genealogical tree research. But there’s a reason why they have names like Theory of Family Relativity (at MyHeritage) or...