How do we know?

Genealogy’s one constant question The Legal Genealogist doesn’t generally go ballistic while poking around on Ancestry.com. Particularly when reviewing somebody else’s family tree, I understand that what I’m looking at is generally at best a...

Read the law books

Yes, read them, really The Legal Genealogist loves it when this happens. A fabulous question just came in minutes ago in a comment to Wednesday’s post about private laws,1 and I absolutely can’t wait to answer it. Reader Sylvia Anne Nash had reviewed that...

Drawing the lines

When county borders get fuzzy As genealogists we all know how counties are created, right? The legislature of the appropriate jurisdiction — colony, territory or state — passes a law creating the new county and setting out its borders. Kind of like what...

Birthing a cousin

It really shouldn’t be this hard… She was born 110 years ago today in a little town in Wichita County, Texas. Or maybe not. And The Legal Genealogist is getting really annoyed at finding these gaps in the research files… Typically on a family...

Oh, and by the way…

… the war is over It may be one of the things The Legal Genealogist loves best about genealogy. Learning all those things about history that we never learned in school. Our obligation as family historians, of course, is to put our families into the context of...

Changing gears

… legally speaking … Sometimes just knowing what the law is, isn’t enough. Sometime what we need to know is how and when the law changed. After yesterday’s blog post about expatriation and some of the records created by repatriation,1 a reader...

Oh, that Babe

A lesson from the records It’s a birth record from more than a century ago. A male child born 6 February 1895 in Baltimore, Maryland. It records a singular moment of American history — sports history, to be exact. And it offers a perfect example of what we...