Welcome, Number 10!

New York legislature passes adoptee OBC bill As the hours and even minutes ticked down to the adjournment of the New York legislature’s 2019 session, adoptees and genealogists held their breath. Would it happen, in a state not known for its generosity of vital...

The legal power of genealogy

Revealed by a Washington document It’s a wonderful article, despite its persistent misspelling of the word “genealogy.” Written by Karin Wulf and posted at Smithsonian.com just this morning, the article proclaims: “This Long-Ignored Document, Written by George...

Memorial Day, 2019

Remembering the fallen It is Memorial Day here in the United States — the official holiday and the end of the three-day weekend during which we honor those who gave all for the cause of American freedom. It was added to the federal holiday calendar in 1888 as...

That other DNA

Something else the letters stand for Everyone who reads The Legal Genealogist on a regular basis knows what DNA stands for. It’s deoxyribonucleic acid. One of two types of molecules that encode genetic information.1 But from now on, around here and everywhere...

Happy birthday, FamilySearch.org!

And thank you for a GREAT 20 years online The genealogical community needs to throw a birthday party today. FamilySearch is turning 20. Well, not exactly FamilySearch, of course… it’s certainly been around longer. But its online arm, FamilySearch.org, is...

Fifty years of Jamboree

One more day for pre-registration pricing The deadline is tomorrow, May 22, 2019. That’s it for pre-registration pricing for what probably wins the title as the most-fun-genealogical-conference-around. It’s the Southern California Genealogical Society...

Rest in peace, dear friend

Oh, to be in Delaware… There are times, like today, when The Legal Genealogist looks forward to a destination just like a little kid getting ready for a trip to Disney World. I’ve never been to the Wisconsin Historical Society, and today I will fix that...

And the letter L today is for…

A major loss The alphabet soup series here at The Legal Genealogist generally focuses on oddball terms that appear in legal documents and are often misunderstood by genealogists. But today’s entry, for the letter L, has to be a little different. It could be for...

Learning from the past

Preach it, Lara… On the second of March 1900, the Mullens family of Berk Creek, Kanawha County, West Virginia, lost two little girls. Martha Mullens was six years old. Her sister Myrtle was just 20 months old.1 Lawrence Jennings Bird of Welford, West, Virginia,...