Select Page

Family feuds, Kiwi-style

Dueling administrators Oh, the tales the court records tell… And it doesn’t really matters whose court records or where or why… there is always a story to be told. For some reason, The Legal Genealogist ended up poking around in records of the New...

The women of Sacramento County

Going it on their own They weren’t at all rare. It happened all the time. The Legal Genealogist found that the court records and even the newspapers of the day are full of the reports: • On the 23rd of February 1880, the application of Eliza J. Limbaugh was...

Be it resolved…

Read the resolutions The question is one of the “Frequently Asked Questions” on the National Park Service website for the Washington Monument in Washington, D.C.: “What is inside the Washington Monument?” The answer, in part, is that: “The interior walls are lined...

A private matter

Recorded forever in the laws The Legal Genealogist believes it 100%: there isn’t very much in genealogy that’s quite as much fun as a good juicy divorce. Divorce records often disclose details we can’t find elsewhere: things like the maiden names of...

For Washingtonians too

An option for the Evergreen State So… a couple of days ago, The Legal Genealogist told Oregonians about a terrific resource for legal research into the early laws of Oregon and a number of west coast and mountain states. The State of Oregon Law Library offers...

Licensing liquor

The 1849 repealer The Legal Genealogist could have predicted it. Should have foreseen it. In yesterday’s blog post, I wrote about the 1844 Oregon law that banned ardent spirits — liquor — completely from the territory, and mentioned, simply, that “It...

The gift of land

A double-edged sword It is one of the most remarkable pieces of legislation of its time. With the official title of “An Act to create the Office of Surveyor-General of the Public Lands in Oregon, and to provide for the Survey, and to make Donations to Settlers of the...

Finding the Feds

Sources for federal laws Since this appears to be Resource Week here at The Legal Genealogist, it’s time to review one particular type of resource that comes up time and again: How do we find federal statutes? This came up just recently in a reader question...