In Record Group 21

The records of a life-changing event Her name was Lucy Ridsdale. She lived in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and 107 years ago today she lost a gold English watch, a silver tea pot, Spanish lace scarves and more, amounting to more than $3,000 in value. His name was Emilio...

The public options

Check those public law school libraries It will come as no surprise to the readers of this blog that The Legal Genealogist is … well … um … a law geek. And thinks that every genealogist should make reading the law, learning about the law, even loving...

Indexing the differences

Two Social Security indexes They’re not the same, those two indexes on Ancestry.com. And the differences can be a bit confusing. One is titled “U.S., Social Security Death Index, 1935-2014.” The other: “U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index,...

All Tuckered out with Virginia law

Getting it on with the common law He was, the Colonial Williamsburg website says, “a man of parts.” That’s a pretty good description of a man who was, in his lifetime, a “lawyer, trader, inventor, scholar, professor, judge, essayist, poet, gardener, (and)...

Meanwhile in Lancaster County

A resource for Pennsylvania’s fourth county It was formed in 1729 from Chester County, Pennsylvania, the fourth county ever created in Pennsylvania, because of concerns of residents that “thieves, vagabonds, and ill people” had infested the rural areas —...

A New York State of laws

Kudos to The Advancing Genealogist Once upon a time there was a terrific website called Manhattan Past that had collected links to many of the New York State (and colonial) laws that genealogists might need to use. Alas, as of last fall, that website had apparently...

Down the legal rabbit holes

Go ahead… read those laws So… The Legal Genealogist is poking around some late 18th century and early 19th century Massachusetts statutes to try to get an answer to a reader question. The answer is taking more time than expected… and it isn’t...

The business of genealogy

Looking at corporate history It was 167 years ago today that two men joined forces in New York City to start a new business designed to serve the needs of a growing nation in the wake of the California Gold Rush. Their names: Henry Wells. William G. Fargo. Yes, that...