The call of those ancestral lands

It hits like a ton of bricks.

No matter how many times The Legal Genealogist has been there.

When you see that places that was home to one who came before you, it hits you.

It grabs you by the heart and it doesn’t let you go.

This time, it was crossing into Culpeper County, Virginia, driving down for the Virginia Genealogical Society’s 2019 spring conference.

This, I thought. This was our land.

My fifth great grandparents, Thomas and Dorothy (Davenport) Baker, lived on land here — in this place — when this county was formed in 1749. The county was brand-new when my fourth great grandfather David Baker was born there in June of 1749.

It was here, for the first roughly 30 years of his life, that David called home.

These hills.

This sky.

This golden sunshine of the late afternoon sun.

These spring breezes.

These birds flying overhead.

These flowers.

These trees.

Maybe even this dogwood… or its ancestor.

Dogwood

Yes, it’s been 270 years since David was born in this place.

It may be that those fields were forests then, or those forested areas were planted fields.

But we have come full circle, David and I.

I am here now.

In the place where he was born.

Where he played. And where he worked. And where he grew. And from whence he and his brothers went off to war.

This is the place he called home.

This land.

Those hills.

This sky.

This golden sunshine of the late afternoon sun.

It grabs you by the heart and it doesn’t let you go.

It’s a place called home.


Cite/link to this post: Judy G. Russell, “A place called home,” The Legal Genealogist (https://www.legalgenealogist.com/blog : posted 13 Apr 2019).

Image: Virginia State Parks, CC BY 2.0

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