Registration opens Wednesday, February 14

So you didn’t make it to the Salt Lake Institute of Genealogy in January.

And you didn’t register for the Institute of Genealogy and Historical Research for its June classes.

Are you starting to feel distinctly left out on your genealogical education for 2018?

Don’t be! There are great options for 2018, including three full-week sessions at GRIP — with registration due to open for all three sessions on Wednesday, February 14.

GRIP, of course, is the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh, going into its seventh season this year, with two week-long sessions at LaRoche College in Pittsburgh (24-29 June 2018 and 22-27 July 2018) and a new third week to be held at Daemen College, Amherst, New York (Buffalo) from 29 July-3 August 2018. Co-directors Elissa Scalise Powell, CG, CGL, and Deborah Lichtner Deal have a terrific line-up of courses offering in-depth immersion for each of these three sessions, and one of these is bound to be just what you’re looking for.

Unlike past years, registration for all sessions opens on the same day — but at different times. Registration for the June session at LaRoche opens at 11 a.m. (8 a.m. Pacific), registration for the July session at LaRoche College in Pittsburgh opens at 1 p.m. Eastern (10 a.m. Pacific), and registration for the August session at Daemen College in Amherst opens at 3 p.m. (noon Pacific).

The Legal Genealogist’s own course, Women and Children First! Research Methods for the Hidden Half of the Family, is in the July session at LaRoche College in Pittsburgh, and you’ll forgive me of course if I say I think it’s pretty much a perfect offering for just about anybody. The women of our families — mothers, sisters, wives — and the children they bore and raised comprise far more than just a hidden half of our families: in fact, they greatly outnumbered the menfolk. Yet they left fewer traces in the records and researching these family members effectively poses challenges for any genealogist. We’ll explore in this course the question of why we should –- and how we can –- research women and children first.

Join me and instructors Catherine B. W. Desmarais, Thomas W. Jones, Kelvin Meyers, Michael Ramage, Richard G. Sayre, and Marian Smith of USCIS, for a great week learning about Women and Children First! Research Methods for the Hidden Half of the Family.

And if you’ve already taken that course, or the timing doesn’t work for you, here’s what else is available in the three GRIP sessions in 2018:

June Session, 24-29 June 2018, LaRoche College:

Mastering the Art of Genealogical Documentation
Coordinator:
Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG

Documentation lies at the heart of respectable genealogy. Without clear and complete citations to supporting sources no family compilation or report can be credible. Therefore, all serious genealogists document their work. Students taking this course will learn how to understand their sources well enough to describe them. Then they will learn how to apply that knowledge to crafting citations. This hands-on course will help students gain understanding of how to create conventional citations with artistry, clarity, completeness, conciseness, and competence.

In-Depth Sources for U.S. Military Research
Coordinator:
Michael J. Hall

This course offers an in-depth examination of the various military records that are highly used including Compiled Service Records, Pensions, Bounty Land Warrants, Muster Rolls, Ships Logs, etc. Key military terminology words and phrases will be identified and discussed. Understanding the patterns associated with each of the records, gives students a working knowledge of each record type, and its importance. Practical application and critical thinking workshops follow each class giving the student a “hands on” experience with mentors to assist.

Chromosome Mapping
Coordinator:
Karen Stanbary, CG

Genealogists who have completed beginning DNA courses and wish to bring their research to the next level will enjoy this course. An integral component of this course is visual phasing, a technique to map the crossover points of a group of three siblings which facilitates the reconstruct of their grandparents’ genome. Assistance is given to map students’ autosomal DNA, determining the specific ancestors who contributed to the participants own DNA, segment by segment. Participants will leave the course with atDNA analysis software installed with their own data and the skills needed for
continuing analysis.

Irish Research
Coordinator:
David Rencher, AG, CG

Participants will acquire a solid foundation for their Irish research. Hands-on class exercises and homework will enhance the learning experience with step-by-step instructions to take the course learning from theory to practice on the student’s own Irish research problems.

From Confusion to Conclusion: How to Write Proof Arguments
Coordinator:
Kimberly Powell

When the research is over, how do genealogists transform complexity of evidence into a coherent, understandable, written proof argument? This hands-on course will feature a variety of strategies, tools, and techniques for making data understandable in written form, as well as lectures and case studies from a diverse group of published authors demonstrating their strategies and methods for moving from disorganized evidence to a well-structured, convincing proof argument.

Family Archiving: Heirlooms in the Digital Age
Coordinator:
Denise Levenick

This course will offer researchers of all skill levels guidance in understanding, preserving, and incorporating family collections in legacy family history projects. Genealogists and society members who inherit collections and want to learn how to safely preserve artifacts, efficiently digitize and archive both digital and physical materials, and use heirlooms to enrich their family history. Students will practice hands-on preservation, digitizing, and archival skills throughout the week using original artifacts, documents and photographs supplied by the instructor or student.

Researching New York State: Resources and Strategies
Coordinator:
Karen Mauer Jones, CG

This course is for researchers who have been conducting genealogical research but may not know much about New York resources. The course will present a practical, in-depth exploration of New York record groups with hands-on exercises for all parts of the Empire State.

Thinking Genealogically: Advanced Methods
Coordinator:
Rev. David McDonald, D.Min., CG

Having mastered intermediate genealogical research skills, this course is intended for those who have devoted substantial amounts of time to genealogical pursuits. Primarily, our endeavors and efforts will be to stretch the researcher’s mind to thinking intuitively about tasks and methods of utility as a genealogist. After a time, a researcher should almost instinctively begin to think about how to approach a research problem, an information source, or a genealogical goal. While one may not choose to seek credentials in the field, the skills and forms taught here would be of use to those who are considering the option down the line.

July Session, 22-27 July 2018, LaRoche College:

Intermediate Genealogy: Tools for Digging Deeper
Coordinator:
Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

Have you moved beyond the initial stages of researching your family history? Maybe you have done a lot online but know there’s more to be done elsewhere. Do you need a firmer foundation before taking advanced or specialized courses? Would you like more experience with in-depth evaluation of documents and setting up research plans? The course covers 19th through 21st century U.S. records and online resources. Make sure you bring a copy of some of your own family history research to use in putting your new learning to work.

Churches and Their Records: Communities that Shaped Our Ancestors
Coordinator:
Rev. David McDonald, D. Min., CG

Learn the nature and history of various sects and traditions in order to understand your ancestors and what type of records each religion kept and for what purposes. The differences and similarities in traditions will help in understanding ancestors who “switched” religions.

Fundamentals of Forensic Genealogy for the 21st Century
Coordinators:
Catherine B. W. Desmarais, CG; Kelvin Meyers; Michael Ramage, J.D., CG

Come explore your potential role in the fast-growing field of forensic genealogy. The instructors – all experienced, practicing forensic genealogists – will cover a broad spectrum of topics including the types of work in which forensic genealogists engage, skills in “reverse genealogy” (descendant research), work products, and an exploration of standards as they relate to forensic genealogy.

Walking in Penn’s Woods: Pennsylvania Research
Coordinator:
Amy E. K. Arner

Researchers who have experience working with original records (such as deeds and probate files), but are not familiar with the idiosyncrasies of Pennsylvania records will enjoy the course focus on typical record types you will encounter, with hands-on exercises. If you want to know more about the lives of your Pennsylvania ancestors, join us for five days of digging deeper into the wealth of resources that await you in Penn’s Woods.

Women and Children First! Research Methods for the Hidden Members of the Family
Coordinator: Judy G. Russell, JD, CG, CGL

(See description above)

Practical Genetic Genealogy
Coordinator:
Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D.

Have you taken a DNA test and want to know how to work with the results? In this course, basic DNA inheritance patterns and analysis are described in an easy-to-understand way. Inheritance of all four types of DNA are covered: Y (direct paternal line), X (unique inheritance for males and females), mitochondrial (direct maternal line), and autosomal (inherited from all ancestral lines). Practical exercises and demonstrations will build understanding, along with how to use third party tools.

Advanced Genetic Genealogy
Coordinator:
CeCe Moore

Be prepared for a fast-paced learning experience intended for the genealogist who has experience applying DNA testing to family history research and has a strong foundational understanding of genetic genealogy concepts. We will demonstrate and discuss methods used by expert genetic genealogists to get the most out of DNA results, utilizing all four types of DNA, in conjunction with documentary evidence to advance knowledge of an individual’s family tree. Genetic genealogy’s application to unknown parentage search will also be examined and resources explored for when unexpected results are encountered. We will end each day with a discussion session to enhance and reinforce the day’s coursework.

You Be The Judge: Practicum Using Standards to Evaluate Genealogical Work
Coordinator:
Jeanne Larzalere Bloom, CG

During this course-a supervised practical application of Genealogy Standards-students will be the judges. Each day students will evaluate genealogical work samples of unknown quality to determine whether the samples meet, partially meet, or do not meet standards. From these exercises students will gain insight into the mindset and the habits involved in consistently producing work that meets standards. Students will develop evaluation strategies to identify weaknesses in their writing or in the writing of others. Students will begin to develop the evaluation skills needed to assess the quality of their work and the work of others. This is a forum for discussions of each standard and for substantive genealogy questions.

August Session, 29 July-3 August 2018, Daemen College (NY):

Intermediate Genealogy: Tools for Digging Deeper
Coordinator:
Paula Stuart-Warren, CG, FMGS, FUGA

(See description, July session, LaRoche.)

Practical Genetic Genealogy
Coordinator:
Blaine Bettinger, Ph.D., J.D.

(See description, July session, LaRoche.)

Advanced Genetic Genealogy
Coordinator:
CeCe Moore

(See description, July session, LaRoche.)

Mastering the Art of Genealogical Documentation
Coordinator:
Thomas W. Jones, Ph.D., CG, CGL, FASG

(See description, June session, LaRoche.)

Refining Internet and Digital Skills
Coordinator:
Cyndi Ingle (of CyndisList.com)

This course will progress through several computer and internet topics including: organizing our computers and digital filing; digital planning for a typical research plan; effectively searching the Internet, online databases an d records repositories; learning the ins and outs of several popular, and necessary, repositories online and how to take notes and create citations for these online repositories; technology tools that enhance the research experience: spreadsheets, tables, timelines, maps, foreign language translation, etc.; the final product of a research plan or project. We will talk about photographs and the scanning and filing of digital images. We will discuss technology options for publishing a final report, whether that takes place on a web site, a digital family tree, a blog, or by creating a printed book. And last, but certainly not least, we will discuss whether or not a complex research problem can be solved solely online, with specific references to meeting the GPS, the Genealogical Proof Standard, thus inspiring the attendees to use everything they’ve learned over the week to successfully move forward in their research.

Advanced Land Research: Beyond Deeds
Coordinators:
Rick Sayre, CG, CGL and Pam Sayre, CG, CGL

Land genealogy is as important as people genealogy for overcoming family history research barriers. This course explores land distribution in the current United States by colonial powers, private land claims, federal land records at both the National Archives and the General Land Office, and local-level county or town deeds. Students will learn about the Public Land Survey System and the metes and bound system. Course content illustrates the use of land records to prove kinship. Use of software and Internet resources for finding land records, mapping, and deed platting is demonstrated.

Tools and Strategies for Tackling Tough Research Problems
Coordinator:
Kimberly Powell

A hands-on workshop/practicum focused on tools and methodologies for tackling tough research problems. This course will be methodology-focused, rather than records-focused, and includes a mix of lectures, interactive case studies (with class participation) and plenty of hands-on practice (such as analyzing documents, creating a research plan, creating timelines, using charts and spreadsheets, etc.) The emphasis is on research planning, analysis and correlation of evidence, and research methodologies.

Because this line-up is so solid, class space is going to go fast. If you want in, you need to be ready to go when registration opens Wednesday, February 14, at the time set for the session and class you want.

There are registration instructions on the website that you’re going to want to read through in advance so you can be ready to go when registration opens. But because a countdown timer has been installed on the registration page which will go automatically at the “zero hour” to the registration management system you won’t have to watch the clock, hit refresh, or otherwise fear that you will miss the “opening bell.”

Good luck getting into the course you want!

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