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An Oregon connection

A young sailor cousin Given the size of The Legal Genealogist‘s family, it’s hardly surprising to find a state where some relative lives or has lived in the past. In fact, since my mother was one of 12 children, 10 of whom lived to adulthood, and her...

The joys of tax research

… or, how I learned to wish my ancestors paid their #$%@$# taxes If ever you wanted evidence of The Legal Genealogist‘s family’s deep Scots-Irish roots, today’s foray into the records would prove it. You see, there is one characteristic for...

They never met

Thank heavens The Legal Genealogist had two grandfathers who served in the armed forces during World War I, that war to end all wars that the United States entered 100 years ago this week. The two men never met. And all I can say is… thank heavens. My...

Her name was Fan

Documenting the enslaved It was the 14th day of April 1831, and William M. Robertson needed money. A hatter in Lowndes County, Mississippi, he owned a hat shop in the Town of Columbus, the county seat. And he wanted to borrow $150.40. John Billington had the money to...

Written in the inside covers

Noting the inscriptions This week’s discussion here at The Legal Genealogist of law books and legal dictionaries morphed into noting what’s written inside the covers of books. And, of course, what that writing tells us about our families. And about...

Remembering an Oklahoma pioneer

One special woman The Legal Genealogist cannot be here, in this particular place, at this particular time, without her thoughts turning to this one ancestor in particular. No, it’s just not possible to be here in Oklahoma, during this week of March when we...

That maternal line

In honor of International Women’s Day Raised by the women who are stronger than you know A patchwork quilt of memory only women could have sewn The threads were stitched by family hands, protected from the moth By your mother and her mother, the weavers of your...

The maiden name

A family for Melinda It stands out there, in The Legal Genealogist‘s database. The birthdate, given in detail, as March 4, 1859. And the name of the person born that day: Melinda. Maybe Malinda. Or something like that. Her married name: Baker. Not much of a...

The baby boom of February

Something in the May air? There must be something about the end of May. Something about the way spring is folding itself into summer. Something about the way the days are getting long, the evenings golden and warm. Something about the way the nights … well, the...

O Reverend, where art thou?

Wedding bells in Texas It was 121 years ago tomorrow when they stood before a minister, probably in Bexar County, Texas, and said their “I do”s. On February 19, 1896, Jasper Carlton Robertson was just a couple of months short of his 25th birthday — he would turn...