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Name that court

Finding the records means knowing the court A rose by any other name might smell as sweet, but having forty-‘leven names — depending on the jurisdiction — for one key court creating one key set of records isn’t a sweet thing for genealogists to...

The changing times

From freeholder to householder It changed, there in Tennesee, in 1809. You can — if you’re like The Legal Genealogist and a bit of a law geek and like to read the laws — see the change right there in the laws. It’s always fun for me, when...

Guardian for a son

A father appointed by the court The question comes up repeatedly. Why would a father have to be named guardian of his own child? It came up again just this morning in a question from a reader. She was looking at an Indiana family in the 1860s, where the mother died...

2017 alphabet soup: H is for…

The language of the law. Part Latin, part Greek, part Anglo-Saxon, all confusing. Along with hundreds of other genealogists from around the country, and even the world, The Legal Genealogist is heading off to Pittsburgh today for the 2017 Federation of Genealogical...

2017 alphabet soup: D is for…

The language of the law. Part Latin, part Anglo-Saxon, all confusing. The Legal Genealogist is back in the air today, heading away from the Midwest African American Genealogy Institute (MAAGI) in Fort Wayne, Indiana, and towards the Genealogical Institute on Federal...