Term of the day: jubilacion

Travel obligations and internet issues are going to be interfering with daily posts for at least some of the next 10 days to two weeks. So nobody will go into withdrawal, however, The Legal Genealogist offers…

The term of the day:

JUBILACION.

dancing_people.netalloy.openclipAnd no, actually, that isn’t spelled wrong at all.

Yeah, yeah, I know that the common English word is “jubilation.” And that would be the word meaning “great happiness or joy.”1

But this term isn’t from English and you won’t find it in the common law tradition at all.

Instead, it’s from Spanish law — out of the civil law tradition — and you can think of it as a Spanish law version of a civil service pension.

The term means “the privilege of a public officer to be retired, on account of infirmity or disability, retaining the rank and pay of his office (or part of the same) after twenty years of public service, and on reaching the age of fifty.”2

Come to think of it, except for the infirmity or disability part, that might be cause for great happiness or joy, now, wouldn’t it?


SOURCES

Image: Open Clip Art, user netalloy

  1. Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary (http://www.m-w.com : accessed 21 Oct 2013), “jubilation.”
  2. Henry Campbell Black, A Dictionary of Law (St. Paul, Minn. : West, 1891), 652, “jubilacion.”
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3 Responses to Term of the day: jubilacion

  1. Nancy Moll says:

    I must admit, I pictured an old negro Church revival.

    This would be a good starting point for our elected officials:

    “the privilege of a public officer to be retired, on account of infirmity or disability, retaining the rank and pay of his office (or part of the same) after twenty years of public service, and on reaching the age of fifty.”

  2. The verb “jubilar” is still used in Spain for “to retire”. I’m now at the age where I hear that word used many times when we visit my Spanish in-laws and my husband’s cousins in Spain.

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