The 21st Century stuff at FGS

Technology and genetics in Fort Wayne

Okay… so you’re sitting there in the opening session at Journey through Generations, the 2013 conference of the Federation of Genealogical Societies in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

FGS_2013_speaker_badgeIt’s Happy Birthday, Sweet Sixty: The Roots of Rock & Roll and 1950s America — the genealogy of music!

How cool is that?

And if you’re sitting there thinking to yourself… what else is there at FGS that’s more in tune (sorry, couldn’t resist the pun) with modern times?

Why, the answer is simple: technology and genetics as they’re used in genealogy, of course.

Here are The Legal Genealogist‘s picks for best options of the conference in these areas.

Genetic genealogy

There are only four genetic genealogy presentations, so why choose among ‘em? Go for ‘em all!

T-206, today, 11 a.m.
DNA Testing for Genealogy: The Basics

by Robert D. McLaren

DNA testing terminology, the types of DNA testing (Y-DNA, mitochondrial, autosomal) and the benefits and limitations of each type of DNA testing are covered.

T-217, today, 2 p.m.
Going Nuclear: DNA Discoveries to Trace All Lines of Descent

by Debbie Parker Wayne CG

Learn to link families using autosomal DNA test results from any testing company. Maximize impact on your genealogical research goals.

T-226, today, 3:30 p.m.
AncestryDNA: Making the DNA Connection

by Kenny Freestone
Sponsored by Ancestry

DNA testing is radically changing the technology we use to connect with our ancestors and discover new family relationships. New technologies enable people to connect with their personal histories.

T-234, today, 5 p.m.
Once You Have Your DNA Results, What Next?

by Robert D. McLaren

Learn how to understand DNA test results (Y-DNA, mitochondrial, autosomal). Benefits and limitations are illustrated. Some useful tools developed for the presenter’s DNA project are covered.

Technology for genealogy

There are a lot more options in the technology field. Things you may have already considered, and things that may be completely new. Here’s a round half-dozen of the ones you might find most useful.

F-302, Friday, 8 a.m.
Using Technology to Increase Your Genealogical Learning

by Patricia Walls Stamm CG, CGL
Sponsored by National Genealogical Society

Genealogical learning is no longer restricted to a local classroom or a distant seminar. Hear about the many options you have, including blogs, webinars and web classrooms.

F-338, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Evernote for Every Genealogist

by Cyndi Ingle Howells

Clip notes from the web, write notes, record audio or webcam notes and more. Sync your notebooks on the web with your computer and every mobile device you own.

F-347, Friday, 5 p.m.
Locating and Accessing Published Genealogies Online

by George G. Morgan

Published family histories are available in both printed format and on the Internet. You’ll learn how to maximize your searches to locate both print and electronic materials.

S-402, Saturday, 8 a.m.
eBooks for Genealogists

by Pamela Boyer Sayre CG, CGL

Learn about free and paid every-word searchable eBooks that can be used online or downloaded to a reader such as Kindle, smart phone, or iPad.

S-419, Saturday, 11 a.m.
Scanning 101

by Eric C. M. Basir

Covers choosing a scanner with the right features, techniques for finding your scanner’s “sweet spot,” and scanning various types of originals, such as prints, negatives and oversized originals.

S-447, Saturday, 5 p.m.
Advanced Googling for Grandma

by Cyndi Ingle Howells

Learn about advanced search and other tools offered by Google. We’ll dig deep and learn how to make them work for your research.

And I still haven’t figured out how to be in more than one place at one time…

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