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Digitize that book

It’s always such a pleasure for The Legal Genealogist to go poking around in digitized volumes of early statutes.

There’s always something to learn, in the pages of those early laws.

About the way people thought in a particular time and place.

About what was considered important.

About what would and wouldn’t be allowed.

About where and how people lived.

About local history.

Even about local politics.

And … sigh … occasionally, about what can’t be found.

At least not online.

At least not by me.

You see, Arkansas — where I’m speaking tomorrow at the Saline Public Library in Benton for its 2017 Genealogy for You Seminar — began its laws when it was still a territory. Its General Assembly met a total of 10 times during the territorial period, in nine regular sessions and one special session.

And in those 10 sessions it produced 10 volumes of session laws:

Laws of the Territory of Arkansas … 1819 and 1820 (Arkansas: William E. Woodruff, Territorial Printer, 1821)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1821 (Little Rock: William E. Woodruff, Territorial Printer, 1822)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1823 (Little Rock: William E. Woodruff, Territorial Printer, 1824)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1825 (Little Rock: William E. Woodruff, Territorial Printer, 1826)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1827 (Little Rock: William E. Woodruff, Territorial Printer, 1828)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1828 (Little Rock: William E. Woodruff, Territorial Printer, 1828)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1829 (Little Rock: William E. Woodruff, Territorial Printer, 1830)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1831 (Little Rock: Charles Bertrand, Territorial Printer, 1832)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1833 (Little Rock: William E. Woodruff, Territorial Printer, 1834)

Acts … of the Territory of Arkansas … 1835 (Little Rock: Smith & Reed, Territorial Printers, 1835)

You can see the problem right away, can’t you?

Ten volumes of session laws.

And nine hyperlinks to digitized versions.

Now… I’m pretty good at online searches. Not perfect, by any means, but pretty good.

I know not to just look on Google Books, but to check other digitized book sources like Internet Archive and Hathitrust. I know to look and see what’s been digitized by the Arkansas State Library. (And yes, Cyndi, I did check the new Laws & Statutes category for Arkansas on Cyndi’s List too.)

But I can’t find a digitized copy of those 1833 session laws.

So… here’s the challenge, Arkansas. Show me where one can be found online… or get it digitized and put online.

C’mon now… let’s get the whole set of territorial laws out there to be easily found…

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