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Something in the May air?

There must be something about the end of May.

Something about the way spring is folding itself into summer.

Something about the way the days are getting long, the evenings golden and warm.

Something about the way the nights … well, the nights must be hot.

Um… literally, even.

As in passion-type hot.

Because there are a ton of February 28th birthdays in The Legal Genealogist‘s family tree.

From a fourth great granduncle, John Jones Jr., born according to family information on the 28th of February 1785,1 to a third cousin once removed who’ll only be identified as N.R., who was born in the 21st century and is way too young to consent to being featured in a blog — there are a lot of February 28th birthdays.

John T. Baker was born on February 28, 1829, most likely in Monroe County, Indiana.2 He was my second cousin four times removed, or my third cousin five times removed, depending on which line you look at (Baker or Davenport). His grandfather Henry Baker was the brother of my fourth great grandfather. John only lived 15 months. He died on 28 May 1830.3

There were the Robertson twins, born on a February 28th in Lamar County, Texas. There are a whole lot of issues with the twins, starting with their names. Their tombstone records them as Eugean and Clodean, and says they died in 1933.4

Their death certificates say that the boy was named Franklin D. Robertson and the girl Miriam A. Robertson, and they were born and died in 1934.5

Then there’s my brother Paul, born on a February 28th a number of years ago that I won’t mention, except to say that I still find it absolutely appalling that I can now be old enough to remember something that happened, now, some 62 years ago.

And a second cousin Richard, in the Gottlieb branch of the family, born the same day as my brother.

And a first cousin once removed, Rachael, born on a February 28th closer to the end of the 20th century.

And my nephew Dennis, born on a February 28th much more recently… but not as recently as my memory wants to remember it as… I still think of him as the tiny baby he was the first time I laid eyes on him. The reality is, he’s now taller than his mother and — very likely — taller than me.

Add in the other birthdays around the 28th — my grand nephew Jack, who celebrated his third birthday yesterday, and my first cousin Donna who shared Jack’s birthday but has been around a tad longer than he has, and Donna’s father, my Uncle Sonny, born on February 25th, a Thurmond cousin born on February 27th, and even my fourth great granduncle Sterling Jones who was born on February 29th, 1776,6 and you do have to wonder, don’t you?

Just what was it about the end of May?

There must have been something in the air.

Something about the way spring folds itself into summer.

Something about the way the days get long, the evenings golden and warm.

Something about the way the nights … well, the nights must have been hot.

In more ways than one…


SOURCES

  1. George Baumbach, “John Pettypool and Sarah ?Sanford,” Colonial Pettipool-Poole-P’Poole Families (http://www.mindspring.com/~baumbach/ppoole/ : accessed 24 Feb 2017).
  2. Baker Family Bible, 1787-1878; The Holy Bible (Philadelphia : Jesper Harding, printer, 1846), births column, entry for John T. Baker; Bible Records Collection; Dallas Public Library, Dallas, Texas.
  3. Ibid., deaths column.
  4. Restland Cemetery (Roxton, Lamar County, Texas; West 3rd Street at Texas Road 38, Latitude 33°32’25″N, Longitude 95°43’53″W), Baby’s of Eugene and Ruby Robertson marker; photograph by J.G. Russell, 28 Apr 2003.
  5. Texas Department of Health, death certif. no. 13995, Franklin D. Robertson, 28 March 1934, and death certif. no. 13999, Miriam A. Robertson, 19 March 1934; Bureau of Vital Statistics, Austin.
  6. George Baumbach, “John Pettypool and Sarah ?Sanford,” Colonial Pettipool-Poole-P’Poole Families (http://www.mindspring.com/~baumbach/ppoole/ : accessed 24 Feb 2017).
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