Select Page

The youngest son

Trust in God.

It wasn’t a slogan.

It wasn’t even a religious comment.

It was, instead, a name.

Traugott, in German. A name given to a child born 187 years ago tomorrow, on the fifth of February 1830.

Probably bestowed at his baptism in the Lutheran Church.

ossig-kircheFriedrich Traugott Geissler.1 The Legal Genealogist‘s second great-granduncle.

Friedrich after his father, Friedrich Geissler, so perhaps he was called Freddy, perhaps some other diminutive. Maybe something chosen by his mother, Maria Rosina Schumann.

But the middle or baptismal name: Traugott. Trust in God, his parents selected.

Trusting that this child — one of eight children — would be healthy and strong.2

Trusting that he would learn to crawl, then to walk, then to run.

Trusting that he would learn what he needed to learn there in Ossig, the small village in Sachsen-Anhalt, just north of the border with the modern German state of Thuringen,3 where the family lived.

Trusting that he would grow to manhood.

Trusting that he would marry.

Trusting that he would father children, and carry the family name forward into the next generation.

But it was not to be.

On a cold December day in 1844, when Friedrich Traugott Geissler was just 14 years old, his family laid this youngest son to rest in the churchyard of that Lutheran Church in Ossig.4

There are no other records of this boy’s existence. No photos. No mementos. No letters. No diaries.

Nothing to record his life. Nothing to record his family’s hopes and dreams.

But for a church record or two, he might not be known at all.

So we pause today to honor this kinsman, lost too soon.

To reflect on the trust of his parents in choosing his name.

Trust in God, they chose.

Trusting, in the end, for his soul.


SOURCES

Image: Ossig Kirche.

  1. Death record, Evangelische Kirche (Lutheran Church), Ossig, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, 16 Dec 1844, Friedrich Traugott Geissler; Staat-Archiv, Magdeburg (FHL microfilm 1335488).
  2. The death record for the youngest child of Friedrich and Rosina, Johanne Rosine, in 1834, stated that she was their eighth child and fifth daughter. See death record, Evangelische Kirche (Lutheran Church), Ossig, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, 3 Aug 1834, Johanne Rosine Geissler; Staat-Archiv, Magdeburg (FHL microfilm 1335488).
  3. See Google Maps for a view of just where Ossig is. There isn’t even a Wikipedia page for the village.
  4. Death record, Evangelische Kirche (Lutheran Church), Ossig, Sachsen-Anhalt, Germany, 16 Dec 1844, Friedrich Traugott Geissler; Staat-Archiv, Magdeburg (FHL microfilm 1335488).
Print Friendly